Tag Archives: Australian War Memorial

Anzac Day 2014

Every year on 25 April Australian mark the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. It is called ANZAC day and Australia has public holiday to commemorate this day. Sharing some of the touching photos from the day.

Lest we Forget.

Redcliffe, Queensland.

Redcliffe, Queensland. Source: News Corp Australia

The Memorial Cross at Mount Macedon, Victoria.

The Memorial Cross at Mount Macedon, Victoria. Source: News Corp Australia

Gold Coast, Queensland.

Gold Coast, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

The Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne.

The Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne. Source: News Corp Australia

Hobart.

Hobart. Source: News Corp Australia

Redcliffe, Queensland.

Redcliffe, Queensland. Source: News Corp Australia

Point Danger, Tweed Heads.

Point Danger, Tweed Heads. Source: News Corp Australia

Canberra.

Canberra. Source: Getty Images

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland.

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland.

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland.

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

Point Danger, Tweed Heads.

Point Danger, Tweed Heads. Source: News Corp Australia

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland.

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

Redcliffe, Queensland.

Redcliffe, Queensland. Source: News Corp Australia

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland.

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

ANZAC Day Commemorated At Currumbin

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

Eltham, Victoria.

Eltham, Victoria. Source: News Corp Australia

Point Danger, Tweed Heads.

Point Danger, Tweed Heads. Source: News Corp Australia

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland.

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: News Corp Australia

A sea burial, Queensland.

A sea burial, Queensland. Source: Getty Images

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland.

Currumbin Surf Life Saving Club, Queensland. Source: News Corp Australia

Redcliffe, Queensland.

Redcliffe, Queensland. Source: News Corp Australia

Eltham, Victoria.

Eltham, Victoria. Source: News Corp Australia

Eltham, Victoria.

Eltham, Victoria. Source: News Corp Australia

Robert Amour with granddaughter Katura Halleday.

Robert Amour with granddaughter Katura Halleday. Source: News Corp Australia

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Anzac day

Every year on 25 April Australian mark the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. It is called ANZAC day and Australia has public holiday to commemorate this day. I am going to city in the afternoon to watch the parade.

What does ANZAC stand for?

ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The soldiers in those forces quickly became known as ANZACs, and the pride they took in that name endures to this day.

Why is this day special to Australians?

When war broke out in 1914,Australia had been a federal commonwealth for only 13 years. The new national government was eager to establish its reputation among the nations of the world. In 1915 Australian and New Zeal and soldiers formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli peninsula in order to open the Dardanelles to the allied navies. The ultimate

Australian War Memorial

objective was to capture Constantinople(now Istanbul in Turkey), the capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany.

The Australian and New Zealand forces landed on Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defenders. What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915 the allied forces were evacuated, after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. Over 8,000 Australian soldiers had been killed. News of the landing on Gallipoli had made a profound impact on Australians at home, and 25 April soon became the day on which Australians remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in the war.

Although the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives, the Australian and New Zealand actions during the campaign left us all a powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as the “ANZAC legend” became an important part of the identity of both nations, shaping the ways they viewed both their past and their future.

Early commemorations

The 25th of April was officially named ANZAC Day in 1916. It was marked by a wide variety of ceremonies and services in Australia, a march through London, and a sports day in the Australian camp in Egypt. In London over 2,000 Australian and New Zealand troops marched through the streets. A London newspaper headline dubbed them “the knights of Gallipoli”. Marches were held all over Australia; in the Sydney march, convoys of cars carried wounded soldiers from Gallipoli attended by nurses. For the remaining years of the war, ANZAC Day was used as an occasion for patriotic rallies and recruiting campaigns, and parades of serving members of the AIF were held in most cities.

During the 1920s ANZAC Day became established as a national day of commemoration for the 60,000 Australians who had died during the war. In 1927, for the first time every state observed some form of public holiday on ANZAC Day. By the mid-1930s, all the rituals we now associate with the day – dawn vigils, marches, memorial services, reunions, two-up games – were firmly established as part of ANZAC Day culture.

With the coming of the Second World War, ANZAC Day also served to commemorate the lives of Australians who died in that war. In subsequent years the meaning of the day has been further broadened to include Australians killed in all the military operations in which Australia has been involved.

ANZAC Day was first commemorated at the Memorial in 1942. There were government orders prohibiting large public gatherings in case of a Japanese air attack, so it was a small occasion, with neither a march nor a memorial service. Since then, ANZAC Day has been commemorated at the Memorial every year.

What does it mean today?

Australians recognise 25 April as an occasion of national remembrance, which takes two forms. Commemorative services are held at dawn – the time of the original landing – across the nation. Later in the day, ex-servicemen and women meet to take part in marches through the major cities and in many smaller centres. Commemorative ceremonies are more formal and are held at war memorials around the country. In these ways, ANZAC Day is a time when Australians reflect on the many different meanings of war.

Australian War Memorial wall

 The ANZAC Day Ceremony

At the Australian War Memorial, the ceremony takes place at 10.15 amin the presence of people such as the prime minister and the governor-general. Each year the ceremony follows a pattern that is familiar to generations of Australians. A typical ANZAC Day ceremony may include the following features: an introduction, hymn, prayer, an address, laying of wreaths, a recitation, the Last Post, a period of silence, either the Rouse or the Reveille, and the national anthem. After the Memorial’s ceremony, families often place red poppies beside the names of relatives on the Memorial’s Roll of Honour, as they also do after Remembrance Day services.

LEST WE FORGET.

Source: http://www.awm.gov.au

Road trip to Canberra

I love road trips. Just pack your bag and jump into the car and drive to destination unknown. I wanted to do one for a while but there was so much happening in our life that we couldn’t.  Luckily on last Friday, we decided to go on a road trip to Canberra. It is not far at all, around 3.5hrs drive from Sydney. 

I have a friend, PA, in Canberra. She is working for Australian Defence Force. Every time she comes down to Sydney, she asks us to visit her so this time we decided it was time to visit her too. 

On Friday, the weather was really bad here, wet and windy the whole day. I left work early and went to pick up AS and my friend SS. The traffic was really bad leaving Sydney but as soon as we hit Hume highway, it was cool. The weather was not on our side until we reached Canberra but it was fun to drive with the tourists (AS and SS). I have been to Canberra a few times before so I knew what to expect but AS and SS have never been there so it was fun to hear them talk about empty roads, their excitement in seeing horses and cows gazing on the fields, etc. 

Canberra

In some places, the rain was so bad that I couldn’t really see more than a few meters in front of us but finally we were in front of PA’s house. PA was on the way home from work so we waited for a while and there she came. As it was still raining we took our stuff and ran into the house. 

She shares a 4 bedroom house with a lady so me and AS got our own rooms and SS got her own room too. It was really nice to have a cuppa with a variety of bread from Bread Top after a long tiring drive. We just chatted for a while. It was still raining outside but we decided to go out and have dinner. 

We went to a Korean restaurant called Kimchi in the city centre. They served some nice food. We had kimchi pork, Squid and some dumplings. PA is pure vegetarian so she had vegetable fried rice. AS and SS also tried special Korean rice wine which looked like home-made ‘Tho’ in Nepal. 

The last time we met PA was a few weeks ago during AG’s hen’s night (post here) so we just ate, drank and talked until everyone was a bit tired. Then we headed home to our warm beds as it was till raining outside and quite chilly. 

On Saturday, we were lucky to have a bright sunny day. Once we had breakfast we decided to visit a few tourist places. 

First stop was Cockington Green. I have been there before and  I just love it. It has miniature towns as well as famous international landmarks. These displays are scaled versions of the real things around the world. I am sure it is really hard work to maintain the place as the gardener told us that all the trees and plants are real and maintained in their miniature size. 

Cockington Green

Next we stopped for lunch in the city centre food court. I thinking living in Sydney we are spoiled for choice but in Canberra I found it hard with just a few outlets. Anyway, we had a plate of Turkish food and were off again to the next stop, the Parliament House. 

Parliament House is situated in the middle of the city and it is free to tour. I really lovethe architecture of the place. On my previous tours with a guide I came to know that all the marbles used there were imported from Italy. This time we took our own tour. We went to The House of Representatives and the Senate. It was nice to visit the place where important decisions that affect our lives is made. I love the rooftop of the Parliament the best as it has a great view of the city and it also has green lawns to just sit on and relax. Best of all it has a big Australian flag flying over it. 

Top of Parliament House

Inside, one of the halls was decorated for a wedding reception. It was really beautiful. Can’t imagine how much they pay for the wedding in the Parliament House.

After taking a few photos we went to the Australian War Memorial. Each room in there tells a story of Australian men and women who fought for their country. There were really interesting displays of war-time with miniature soldiers and their surroundings. There were a number of military aircrafts and airplanes in display as well. 

Australian War Memorial wall

On the top floor, on both sides, there are names of all our fallen heroes and lots and lots of poppy flowers decorating them. I think it is a really emotional place for people whose ancestors have fought in the wars. 

After the Memorial we went to see Kangaroos. According to PA, if you are in Canberra you must see Kangaroos in the wild, and we saw so many of them. I have seen them before in the zoo and national parks but seeing them in the wild was a different experience. There were a lot of mothers with their Joeys (Baby kangaroos) in their tummy pouch. And they were not at all afraid of humans. 

As it was getting dark we decided to go home and rest for a while before going out for dinner. As soon as we reached the house, it started raining very heavily so we ended up cooking dinner at home. It was a typical Nepali dinner with rice, dal, kwati, chicken, pappad and tomato achar. 

All of us were in the dinning room till 2 am, talking, when we finally decided to go to bed. It was a really good fruitful day. 

On Sunday, we decided to have a big breakfast. We were all up and cooking bacon, mushrooms, eggs, toast and tea. After breakfast we went to the National Dinosaur Museum where we saw displays of dinosaurs, prehistoric fossils and lots of information about dinosaurs. It was a quick stop before we went to Lake Burley Griffin. The lake is surrounded by well maintained walking and biking paths and lots of greenery to just relax or have a picnic. It feels good to see so many well maintained parks in the centre of the city in Canberra. 

Telstra Tower

Then we drove around the Australian National University to go to the Telstra tower on top of a hill. The tower is not as tall as other towers I have been to but was a great place to see the whole Canberra city. There were open and closed observation decks on different floors. The main one has a café as well. With the glass surrounding, we were able to go around the tower and view and identify different landmarks. The view was amazing. The top observation desk was open and it was very windy, it felt like the wind was strong enough to blow us off the tower. Thank god none of us girls were wearing skirts!. We just went around once very quickly and came back inside. 

Enjoying lunch

After that we returned to the city and had our lunch is an Italian café. I had chicken risotto, PA had spinach penne pasta, SS had chilly penne and AS had Calzone. After lunch we just enjoyed the weather and relaxed for a while.

We were in the middle of the city and the there was no traffic except an occasional bus and some few cars. It was really nice to be away from busy Sydney life style for a change. Finally it was time for us to return to Sydney. We bid adieu to PA and the three of us were back on the road home.  

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