Tag Archives: Mata Tirtha

Mother’s Day 2017

It was Nepali Mother’s day on 26 April. As I have explained here before, it is on a different day than the one here in Australia.

So that morning I called my mum and AS called his mum to wish them Happy Mother’s day and to get their blessings. We miss them more this year as both of them were here last year and it had made our day extra special.

Now I am a mum as well and I feel really proud to be a mum to this gorgeous angel.

I strongly believe that we need to teach our children about our culture and tradition. We can’t just expect them to learn about it. We need to do our best to show them, create interest and get them involved.

Chhori is at an age where she is interested and curious to know about everything so we let her do the whole process on her own, including tika and sagun. She was really well behaved and followed the instruction.

We concluded the ceremony by cutting a cake.

Then on 14 May, it was Mother’s Day in Australia so Chhori’s childcare invited us for Mother’s day high tea on the Friday before that. The center did really well decorating the place and organizing amazing food and nibbles. They had some special signs for the kids to hold making it special for the mums.

The kids also painted and decorated cards for their mums. Chhori managed to decorate a big heart with colors and glitters. She also did a flower which I really loved.

On 14 May, AS helped Chhori to make a breakfast and I was spoiled with yummy food. She said “Happy Mother’s Day’ and “I love you Mama”.

I feel so blessed to have this cutie pie in our life. I know there are times when it is hard to be a mum but her smiling face and a big hug outweighs all the trouble we have to go through.

I love you so much Chhori. You are the heart of our family.

Hope all you beautiful and wonderful Mom’s out there had a great Mother’s Day too.

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

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Happy Aama ko Mukh herne (Nepali Mother’s day)

It was Nepali Mother’s day on Friday 6th May 2016 and Australian Mother’s day yesterday. This year’s mother’s day is extra special for us as we have my mum, and my MIL (she arrived in Sydney yesterday) here.

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I was lucky enough to have my mum here last Mother’s day as well but it is AS’s first Mother’s day after a long time so I made sure they had a good one.

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On Friday we celebrated in the traditional style with sagun, fruits, sweets and cakes. It was nice to observe AS’s celebration as both of them were very happy.

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I also had my Mother’s day for my mum with sagun, fruits, sweets and cake.

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It is nice to have her here and wish we will be together for Mother’s day every year.

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I am a mum now too, so it was nice to be on the other end of the ceremony. Last year Chhori was too small but this year, she is big enough to enjoy the fun. She got me a cute card (AS did :)) and also sagun, fruits, sweets and a cake too.

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My MIL helped her with the tick and sagun for me. She was clam and followed the instructions well.

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It feels so good to be the mother of such a cute munchkin and I am so proud of her.

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And to all the proud moms out there, Happy Mother’s day. Hope you had a good one.

Take care,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

My extra special Aama ko Mukh herne (Nepali Mother’s day)

As I have mentioned in many of my posts before, Nepal has a different calendar than the Gregorian calendar. So in Nepal people also celebrate Mother’s day on a different day than the western calendar. In Australia, Mother’s Day is the second Sunday of May every year but in Nepali calendar, it depends on the moon. It falls on the last day of the dark fortnight of April or early May. This year, it happened to be on 18 April 2015. It is commonly known as Aama ko Mukh herne in Nepal which translates to “Looking at one’s mother’s face”.

This year Aama ko Mukh herne was extra special because my mum is here with me. The last time we were together for Aama ko Mukh herne was more than a decade ago so I was really excited.

To make the day special for her I prepared Sagun, baked cupcakes and a cake. I also bought a dress, a nice watch, fruits, sweets and snacks.

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It was amazing to do the Aama ko Mukh herne ritual in person as compared to on Skype Aama ko Mukh herne.

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Mummy was really happy and I am glad I was able to make her feel special.

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Also this is my first Aama ko Mukh herne as a mum and just looking at Chhori smiling in the morning made my day extra special.

Aama ko Mukh herne, Mata Tirtha, Nepali Mother’s day

So if you haven’t called your mum to wish her, do give her a call and make her smile. And to all the proud moms out there, Happy Aama ko Mukh herne.

Till  next post take care everyone,

from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

My mum, my Super women (Mother’s Day 2014)

Today is Aama ko Mukh herne din ( Mother’s day) in Nepal. Please click here  and here to read more about it. I want to dedicate this post to all the moms of this world.

This article was published in +977 (a Nepalese Lifestyle Magazine in Australia) in April 2014 issue.

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When I was young, I didn’t realised that my mum is a super women. But I know now that my mum is my hero and my treasure, she is like a prize I won the day that I was born.

My mum had a normal upbringing but she started working at a very young age. She worked as a teacher and continued working for most of her life.

When she got married to my dad, as in most of the household in Nepal, being a daughter in law, she had to cook, clean and look after the family and at the same time went to her 9-5 job six days a week.

After doing her daily chores, making sure we had breakfast, our lunch packed and everyone else is fed, she would to the school to teach. She usually arrived home late in the afternoon or before dawn and would prepare our food and take care of our needs.

I can’t remember her complaining about anything but remember her willingness and perseverance to help our family and trying to give me and my brother a better life. I really didn’t understand her sacrifices and to make it worst I used to complain about the food we ate, clothes we wore, toys I owned and other things.

It all seemed normal to me as a kid because most of the women around me were doing the same thing while most of the men were working in a job or business and were served hot meal 3 times a day without needing to lift a finger in the kitchen.

As I became more aware of the society in Nepal, I became aware of gender biases as well. I always asked questions if someone treated me different from my brother and I used to hate the answer when they say, “It is because you are a girl

“Girls should not be saying this.”

“Girls should not be doing this.”

“Girls should be learning how to cook.”

The amazing thing is, most of the times, these words were from the mouth of women like grand ma or aunties than men. As a child, it never understood why I have to be different from my brother. I am the same in every way I can think of to my brother so why I can’t do certain things or why I have to do certain things.

Watching Hollywood movies, I was happy to know that at least in some part of the world, women are treated better and equal and this made me dream of running away from Nepal and finding a future in a country where men and women are equal and gender bias didn’t exist.

When my destiny took me to Australia for further study, in my mind I knew that I was going to a developed country. I was sure my future was going to be much better than in Nepal. I had big dreams and was happy that I was taking the first step towards my dream.

Out of many things, I left behind in Nepal; I thought one of them would be gender bias. Living in Sydney for a while made me realise I was wrong. Like my mum, most of the women here were doing their duty at home as well as at work. Only few lucky ones had husbands who would help a lot in the kitchen and with kids but most women were doing 80% of the house chores while their partners were resting, as they were tired from a hard day’s at work.

Even though western society looks like they have no gender biases in movies I soon realised that the wives and mothers in Australia were going through the same story that my mum was going through in Kathmandu. Only a few lucky enough were telling me a different story but most of them had to look after both house and work. Therefore, my dream of living in a gender equal society was scattering into a million pieces.

I realised only when I started working and studying at the same time, how hard life can be. The hardships I went through as a student in Sydney made me think how great my mum is and how she is a super woman, able to do all that for us.

My mum deserves to be cherished because she taught us the values in life that inspired us to live wisely. She showed us how to be strong in times of weaknesses. She took care of us, fed us and did everything for us without complaining whether she was tired or sick. I feel bad that I used to complain about her food and the things she did or did not do.

Now I am a wife I understand her situation much better. I feel blessed to have an understanding husband but still feel a need to take care of many things in our house. Call it a women’s instinct but there are many things I feel I need to do to make sure our house runs smoothly and it is not an easy job. Right now, we are only two adults in the house and I can’t imagine how life going to be when we will have a couple of kids running around.

After a hard day at work, some days I feel exhausted and tired and remember maybe that’s how my mother felt as well when she was raising us. There are days I don’t want to go to the kitchen and then I remember my mum and how she handled two hungry screaming kids when she got back from work. It wasn’t easy for her and I can feel in my heart what she must have felt then. I know now that I should have appreciated all her efforts and all the sacrifices she made. She deserves to be loved and treated special. She is a superwoman.

mum

One day when I am going to be a mum and I hope to come into my own as a strong woman like my mum. I salute women like my mother who have paved the way for me as not only a woman and wife but someday as a mother and super woman to love and give with a big smile.

Please pick up a phone and call your mum and tell her how much you love her because you may not be this lucky one day.

Take care everyone,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

My Special Mother’s Day

As I mentioned on my previous post, this year was my first Mother’s Day after my wedding. In my culture, you have to make the event special as it will be the first time a married daughter brings food and gifts for her mother from her home (husband’s home). If I was in Nepal, I would need to do all the preparation and make sure my mum had a great day but as I am so far away, my mother in law made sure that the ritual was done properly.

I am so happy that my in laws, mostly my MIL, made such a great effort to make sure my mum’s day was special. She did all the shopping and all the preparations and my FIL helped her a lot. Then my two BILs went and presented the foods and gifts to my mother. They also took these photos for us to see. I am so grateful and thankful for my new family for taking care of this and making sure things went great.

Have a look at the photos below and you can see traditional Newari Mother’s Day celebration. There are Sagun (egg, bara, whisky, fish, yoghurt and meat), also lots of fruits and rotis. It lookes so yummy. My mum also got a sari, a cake and masala. I really wish I could have been there to help prepare for it and to see the smile on my mum’s face.

Aama ko Mukh herne / Mata Tirtha Aunshi (Nepali Mother’s day)

As I have mentioned in many of my posts before,Nepal has a different calendar than the Gregorian calendar. So in Nepal people also celebrate Mother’s day on a different day than the western calendar. In Australia, Mother’s Day is the second Sunday of May every year but in Nepali calendar, it changes every year according to the positions of sun, moon and the planets. It falls on the last day of the dark fortnight of April or early May. This year, it happens to be on today,9 May 2013. It is commonly known as Aama ko Mukh here in Nepal. Aama ko Mukh here translates into seeing mother’s face.

When I was still in Nepal, I used to make a nice breakfast and buy my mum a small present which was the only thing that I could afford with my pocket money. My dad used to buy lots of sweets as well so that there were lots of delicacies for her to eat. Mum used to make Sagun (egg, bara) for my grandma(both dad’s mum and her mum) and we used to use the same for her as well.

In Nepal, if the children have left home/ married, they will come with presents and delicacies to spend time with their mother. The entire day is filled with festivities around the country.

Children whose mothers have already passed away visit the place called ‘Mata-Tirtha’ which is situated at about 15 km to the west of Kathmandu or some other holy place elsewhere in Nepal to make offerings to the souls of their departed mothers. Mata means mother; tirtha means a holy place. Thus, this name suggests the holy place for them to visit for making offerings to the deceased mothers once a year.

A religious festival is held at ‘Mata-Tirtha’ on the Mother’s day for a whole day. There is a legendary natural pond at ‘Mata-Tirtha’ where Nepali people pay homage to their deceased mothers. Thousands of people take a quick bath in the water flowing from the nearby stone spouts, and then they go to the holy pond to make offerings to their deceased mothers. They believe that the souls of their mothers come to this natural pond to accept their offerings on this day. Thereafter, they worship Shiva Linga located next to the holy pond.

A legend behind this day goes as follows. Shepherds used to quench their thirst with the cold water from the natural pond at the current day ‘Mata-Tirtha’ when they went to graze their cattle in a nearby forest. One day, one of the shepherds whose mother was already died happened to go to drink water from this pond she saw the image of her dead mother in the clear water of the pond. She was so excited by this that she went to every house in that village to tell them about how she had seen her mother’s image in the pond. Since then Nepali people have believed that they can see the image of their deceased mothers in the water of this holy spring. So, Nepali people from different parts of the country visit this pond on this day hoping to see the image of their departed mother. Thus, this place came to be a holy place for those who have lost their mothers. Also those who cannot go to Mata-Tirtha shower at home or take a quick dip in the water of a holy river early in the morning then offer a platter of sweets, fruits and money to a priest in the memory of their departed mother.

My MIL sent these gifts to my dad last Father’s day on my behalf

As I have describe in my previous post , in Nepal the first year of marriage is considered to be very important. So during every festival, there are things you are meant to do. This affects how you celebrate Dashain, Tihar, Father’s Day, Mother’s day and more. Last year, I had my first Father’s day after the wedding and my MIL made sure it was a special one for my dad. This year, it is my first Mother’s Day after the wedding so it will be really special for my mum. My MIL is doing everything that she can to make sure this day is memorable for my mum. I know a few details about what is going to happen but I will wait for things to happen today and will update in details about my special Mother’s day. Just so excited to Skype with my mum later and receive photos from Nepal afterwards.

So if you haven’t called you mum to wish her, do give her a call and make her smile. And to all the proud moms out there, Happy Mother’s day.