Monthly Archives: June 2013

Chicken gravy means chicken gravy only, no chicken please

I know the title is very confusing but I will try to explain it.

Last night, AS and I were out and so we decided to eat out. We were discussing what to eat when we saw this South Indian restaurant. I like Indian food so it looked like a good choice to both of us.

We went inside and were given a six sitter table as they didn’t have any empty table for two. I didn’t know much about South Indian dishes expect Dosa so I asked AS as he had spent 5 years in South India.

Anyway, finally we decided to eat Chicken 65 and set meals. AS ordered Anjappar popular non veg  meal which comes with Chappati, rice, chettinad chicken, mutton gravy, fish gravy, rasam, kootu, poriyal , curd and appalam.  For me, I decided to go with Anjappar regular meals that comes with rice, chicken gravy, mutton gravy, fish gravy, rasam, kootu, poriyal , curd and appalam. I knew I couldn’t finish all that but I wanted to try the meal. We got extra chicken as AS told me, from his experience in India, that the meal would have only a few small pieces of meat.

While we are waiting for our food, one of the waiters came and asked if they could sit some other customers on our table too. Don’t get me wrong, I am all up for socialising but not when I am out with my husband trying to enjoy dinner together, I really didn’t want a total stranger on the same table sitting next to us listening to our conversation. So we said Sorry but we wouldn’t be comfortable to have others on the same table. I know it seems rude but they still had tables available in the restaurant but it seemed they didn’t want to use another six sitter table for just three people.

I was actually shocked to see that they even asked about it but AS told, me that it is common in dhabas in India but not in a proper restaurant.

I have eaten North Indian meals before so I was thinking this would be similar but I was so wrong. Firstly, the food was so spicy that I knew I couldn’t eat it all and to top it off, the chicken gravy, fish gravy and goat gravy were just that, gravy, no meat. When I was reading the menu, I had thought it meant chicken with gravy but, no it actually meant just gravy.  I am sure I am not the only one who would be confused by the menu. It seemed quite funny to both me and AS. I was just glad that we had ordered a separate chicken dish which was good but quite spicy.

During the meal, one of the waiters came and tried to put some more dishes on the table. We told him that we hadn’t ordered any more food and he left. He was going around the restaurant and had no clue which table the food he was carrying was for. The tables had numbers but I guess because they put more than one customer in one table, the waiters were getting confused.

Seriously, they are running a nice looking restaurant in Sydney but it was a bit chaotic. AS was telling me that he felt like he was in India with loud South Indian music from the TV, the Bollywood music from speakers and waiters running around in every direction.  But even if their idea was to create an authentic South Indian restaurant environment, they should have given a customer like me a choice to go for a medium spicy meal so that I could at least eat my food. Or maybe I am asking too much from them. I guess I will stick with my favourite dosa when I visit a South Indian restaurant. Anyway I ended up eating only around 1/3 of my meal as it was too spicy. I do eat spicy food but this was super spicy.

The other thing I observed while having dinner was the waiters. I saw one waiter dressed so inappropriately. Sorry I do not want to make fun of him but he is in a customer service business and he was wearing a Wallaby hat (bright yellow), multi coloured jacket and a sunnies while he served and the other waiter was wearing a black shirt with sequence embroidery as if he was going to a club. I seriously think they need a dress code so that the customer can identify the wait staff. I am not really judging people but the business definitely could have used some rules in place.

Please let me know what are some good South Indian dishes (not too spicy though), if you know any. I am always up for trying new food  🙂

Please share you different experience trying new food.

Have a great weekend everyone

XOXO

M from nepaliaustralian

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Lace in Fashion

This article was published in +977 (a Nepalese Lifestyle Magazine in Australia) in May-June 2013 issue.

977 Lace in Fashion

Lace detailing is absolutely beautiful and undeniably feminine and it has always had a particular allure in fashion and now it’s sexy, skin-tight & best worn with ample attitude. It was a textile that signified all that was luxurious, highly desirable and new.

‘Lace’ is a category that includes a number of detailed techniques, from embroidery, macramé, knitting, knotting and crochet, to guipure, Chantilly, Valenciennes and Venetian.

The LBD gets an even sexier tilt when you add a little lace. And don’t forget all the sexy accessories you can get in lace like stocking, bags, belts, shoes, scarfs, headbands, gloves and even umbrellas.

How to wear lace dress?

Colourful Lace

Colour is always good mood enhancer and it is same with a colourful lace dress.  Colours such as bright red or pink will give a sufficient statement to your appearance. Make sure you accessorise in neutral colours .

Casual Lace

For a casual look, you can choose to wear a longer dress with neutral colours. Choose minimal accessories to keep it simple, fun yet elegant.

Metallic lace

If you want something a little more contemporary, choose metallic lace for parties or formal occasions. Metallic lace goes best with black accessories.

Lace for evening

Lace goes perfectly for evening wear or formal events. From long gowns to elegant short dresses, lace will definitely make you look more feminine. Match the accessories and keep it minimal to highlight the dress.

Do you like lace?

Till next post, take care.

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

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I officially hate winter

Today is just the 5th day of winter in Australia but can say that I officially hate winter now. I know most of my readers are from the other side of the world so enjoy your summer guys . But I have to vent out my frustration here.

 

I know that I probably couldn’t enjoy summer if we didn’t have winter but I have some good reasons why I hate winter. Winter is empty, bleak, cold, evil, mean, cruel and most of all annoying. I am open to most things and I like to see the bright side of life. But winter is not definitely on my list.

Here are my reasons why I hate winter:

  1.  I have flu right now and I know it is going to last all winter long. I hate the cough that comes with it. My nose is running too. (I have flu shot every year but still seem to get the flu.)
  2.   Waking up in winter is a 100 times harder than waking up in summer.
  3. I stay in my warm bed till late and have to rush to work.
  4. It is so cold in the morning and so dark when I leave home for work and then it is dark again when I come back home. I hardly get to see any sun light.
  5. Driving with fogged up windows is just awful.
  6. I hate to exercise in this cold weather and have been skipping workout for the last few days 😦
  7. My body automatically packs on insulation (fat) in an attempt to survive the winter.
  8. It is so cold when outside that the many layers I put on don’t seem to do anything.
  9. My nice dresses are being neglected because I need to wear warm jackets and sweaters.
  10. Winter automatically cuts my shoes wardrobe in 1/2. I can’t wear shoes that expose any skin, so my boots and some close shoes are the only ones I can wear.
  11. My washing takes longer to dry as I hate to use a dryer.
  12. My whole body is so dry that I need to moisturise all the time. No matter how much I try to moisturise, I am feeling flaky by midday. Sometimes, I think I just need to bathe in a tub of Vaseline.
  13. I hate rain in winter, not cool at all.
  14. All of you know that I love colour but in winter, I can’t see any colour except grey and black coats and jackets. Thank god I bought a red and a fuchsia long coat from Nepal while I was there the last time.
  15. Nature seems so lifeless during the long winter months, bare trees and brown grasses.

 I normally try to go for a holiday during winter but this year it seems like I am stuck in Australia for the whole winter. So winter, winter please go away.

Are you a summer or a winter person?  Please share you reasons.

Loving Nepali Culture and traditions

This article was published in +977 (a Nepalese Lifestyle Magazine in Australia) in June 2013 issue.

plus977

I have lived in Australian for over a decade and I have to admit, I love Nepal, its culture and traditions more than the day I left her.

It is funny to remember how relived I was when I received the visa to come here. It was like; finally, I was going to be out of Nepal, far from all the stupid traditions and cultures to a new land where I could start all over again. Even though I was very sad leaving my family behind, I was really excited for the possible future. The preparation to leave the country was done with high spirit and positive attitude.

Finally the big day came. Before I left the house, in a traditional manner, my grand ma put a red tika on my forehead, and blessed me with sagun. I still remember the time I spent at the airport in Kathmandu. I was a bit teary eyed while bidding good bye to all the people who came to see me off. I realised that day that I had so many people around me who loved me. I had my parents, my brother, my relatives, my cousins, my school friends and my college friends, more than 30 people there wishing me well and saying their good byes.

Travelling in a plane to Sydney for the first time, I knew I was blessed with loved one but still at the back of my mind, I was happy about my decision about leaving Nepal and coming here.

The first few weeks in Sydney were really exciting as it was a new place, so much to see and explore. I got my first mobile phone and it surely felt like my dream country. But then reality hit me. For the first time in life, I needed to find a job. It was quite an effort to work, to cook meals and study at the same time. I was missing Nepal and home a lot. I convinced myself that the hardship was just temporary and once I got settled, things would change.

Things did change for the better after I got a job and started making friends but I still missed my family and Nepal a lot. I was surprised that I was missing my morning ritual in Nepal, going to the temples with my dad. I was missing my mum’s puja in the morning, the noise of the chaotic traffic of Kathmandu, the vegetables and fruits vendors’ calls selling their stuffs door to door, the sound of temple bells, and missing all the festivals. Being far from home, I realised and slowly started to value the culture and tradition of Nepal which I used not to like.

The first Dashain and Tihar away from home were really hard ones. Even though holidays were the best part of Dashain and Tihar in Nepal, I missed the tika and other religious aspects of these festivals. I also missed celebrating my birthday in a traditional way, tika with sagun in the morning and visiting many temples during the day.

As time passed by, I started embracing Nepali culture and tradition and started following it as much as possible. I started taking down notes of what happens in our culture and it was a joy to explain to people from other countries the different aspects of Nepali tradition. It felt so good to see their reaction when I explained what we do during our festivals, wedding, birth and death. I realise that our culture is so unique and old that it is worth all the effort to preserve it

I started celebrating Dashain and Tihar in full swing and having more family and friends here definitely helped to make it better. Even though I am from a Newar background, I joined my friends when they celebrate Teej and love every minute of it. Living abroad definitely has made me appreciate Nepal and its culture lot more than before.

I went to Nepal and had a very traditional wedding and I was happy to participate in a very elaborate ceremony over many days. Recently, my brother and sister in law were blessed with a baby boy and we made sure we followed all the traditional rituals here even though we are so far away from home. He had his Chhaithi and Nwaran here and we all went to Nepal to celebrate his Pasni with our loved ones.

These days instead of getting annoyed by the tradition and culture in Nepal, I feel inquisitive. I always want to know more why we do Ihi, Gufa , Bartamanda, Saradha, Pasni, Nwaran or any other ritual. I want to learn the legends behind our every festival and one day wish to pass this knowledge on to my kids. I want them to be proud of Nepal and Nepali culture. Even though I am not in Nepal, Nepal and its culture and tradition will always be in me and I hope to spread this love to the next generation so they can be proud of our heritage, tradition and culture.

Do you still follow your cultures and traditions?

Till next post, take care.

M from nepaliaustralia

XOXO

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Learn Nepali: Counting

This is how we count in Nepali. Please click here to learn more Nepali.

English

Nepali

1

ek (A-kh)

2

dui (Du-ee)

3

tien (Tee-n)

4

char (Cha-r)

5

panch (Pa-n-ch)

6

chha (Cha)

7

saat (Sa-at)

8

aath (Aa-th)

9

nau (Na-u)

10

das (Daa-ss)

11

eghara (A-ghaa-ra)

12

bara (Bha-ra)

13

teera (Th-e-ra)

14

chauda (Chau-da)

15

pandhra (Pan-dra)

16

sorha (So-rha)

17

satra (Sat-ra)

18

athara (Aa-tha-ra)

19

unais (Un-nai-s)

20

bis (Bis)

30

teece (Tee-sh)

40

chaleece (Cha-lee-sh)

50

pachaase (Pa-cha-sh)

60

70

sathi (Sat-ti)

sattari (Sa-tha-ri)

80

assi (aa-si)

90

nabbe (nab-be)

100

ek saye (A-kh sai-ya)

200

dwi saye (Du-ee sai-ya)

300

tin saye (Tee-n sai-ya)

1000

ek hazar (A-kh Ha-zar)

2000

dwi hazar (Du-ee Ha-zar)

100,000

ek lakh (A-kh la-kh)

1,000,000

dus lakh (Daa-ss la-kh)

half

aadha (aa-dha)

less

kaam (cum)

more

dherai (dhe-raii)