Tag Archives: dad

Hamilton Zoo: New Zealand

I guess the way we spend time during a holiday has changed completely. I used to write about adventures and running around when we holidayed as a couple but as a family it was a more relaxed pace like spending a day at going to a zoo :).

We have been looking forward to this family getaway for a long time and we were all excited.

First thing at the zoo is a photo in front of the signage 🙂

hamilton zoo (2)

Hamilton Zoo is an average sized zoo, not very big to require days exploring but big enough (25 hectare) to spend with small kids walking, around and enjoying. The best part is that the animals are not caged like in most zoos so visiting Hamilton zoo feels like you are walking in a National park and animals are living in their nature habitat. All the animals are still at a safe distance in massive enclosures so they could roam freely.

hamilton zoo (12) hamilton zoo (17) hamilton zoo (18)

We started our tour with the Rhino first as the lady in the counter told us there is a baby rhino on display who will be removed later.

hamilton zoo (3) hamilton zoo (4)

I guess everything when they are baby are very cute, even the rhino. We enjoyed the two adult rhinos playing with each other while the baby rhino followed her mum around. We spent lots of time there and Chhori was excited to see a rhino after watching all the animal related rhymes.

hamilton zoo (22)   hamilton zoo (14)

It was really nice to see many animals so close as well. I have never seen a red panda or a giraffe so near me. When we visited Dubbo zoo, we had a pretty good encounter with giraffes but this was even better as we are on the same level and I could see how tall they really are. They are just spectacular and we spend lots of time admiring them.

hamilton zoo (15) hamilton zoo (9)

The Sumatran tiger exhibit was also impressive so were the chimpanzee and cheetah.

hamilton zoo (11)

There were many chimpanzees on display and there were some babies too. It was really cool to see them lay a picnic rug before they sat down. So many of their actions reminded me of human beings 🙂

hamilton zoo (24)

We also saw lots of other creatures, including native New Zealand birds and reptiles.

hamilton zoo (21) hamilton zoo (16)   hamilton zoo (8)

The other thing I discovered that day is how patient and great teacher AS is to our daughter. The whole day, he was pointing at animals and birds and explaining to Chhori what they are and talking to her to keep her interested.

hamilton zoo (27) hamilton zoo (25) hamilton zoo (6)

Also I saw how much my parents loved Chhori as they kept on playing with her making sure she was OK. It is so great to have them around.

hamilton zoo (1)

It took us around 3 hours to walk around the whole zoo. Chhori napped for an hour or so during the visit so she was full of energy when she was awake, running around everywhere and enjoying the day.

hamilton zoo (23)

We all were hungry at the end of it so we went to the café onsite for lunch. They even have peacocks walking around the café area. We ordered burger and chips and Chhori had nuggets.

hamilton zoo (5)

There is a playground inside the zoo as well so Chhori and I managed to have fun for a while on the swing before we left the zoo.

hamilton zoo (28)

I have to admit we all had great fun. A perfect way to spend a day in Hamilton.

hamilton zoo (26)

Next stop Hamilton Garden, see you soon with that post.

Take care everyone,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

 

Advertisements

Weaning Chhori from night feed

I am sure I have mentioned before that Chhori is still night feeding on a good night, she wakes up 1-2 times for a feed while on bad ones it is multiple times.

Chhori (4)

This routine didn’t bother me when I was home looking after her but since I started work, it started affecting my day. There were days when I was not functioning properly at all as I was sleep deprived days in a row.

Anyway, this was the signal for me to start looking for a solution to stop night feeding. I still wanted her to breastfeed for the next few months at least but I definitely wanted to stop night feeding.

So the solution was for me to sleep in a different room than Chhori. So AS and Chhori slept in our room and I slept in Chhori’s room.

chhori (5)

First night, she woke up the same as usual and started looking for milk. When she didn’t get it, she cried. She opened her eyes and saw her daddy instead of mummy and she cried more. It took AS a long time to calm her down and put her back to sleep. It was the same every time she woke up looking for milk.

I was in the next room so I could hear her cry and was so tempted to run, hug her and feed her. But I knew that was not going to solve my problem. She is old enough now that she doesn’t need night feeding as most kids over 1 year will not wake up multiple times at night for a feed.

The second night the story was similar but the cry was shorter and AS got better at calming her but I was still tempted to run over to hold her every time she cried. So on the third day, we decided that it is best for me to sleep in the guest bedroom which is further away from our bedroom so I don’t hear much at all. So I have been doing that for the last 5 days. I occasionally hear her cry but not much.

chhori (3)

Also according to AS, she is getting better at not crying even if she wakes up during the night. If she does cry, it lasts less than a minute and she is back to sleep.

We are hoping that in a few weeks, she will get better and will sleep through the night so I can go and sleep back in our room. I really hope this will work otherwise we will be back to square one.

I am loving my 6-8 hours of uninterrupted sleep for sure but AS probably isn’t 🙂

Please, please share any tips that will help this process be easier for me and Chhori. Thanks in advance.

Take care,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

 

My parents are leaving

6 months ago I was so happy and I wrote a post that my parents are coming to stay with us for 6 months. At that time 6 months seemed like a long time but now the time has passed and my parents are leaving this weekend.

Yes, it has been six months since their arrival. After their arrival, they organised my Dahi Chiura ceremony. They were here when we welcomed Chhori into this world and they were here for every small developments with Chhori till now.

Dahi Chiura (15)chhori (4)

We did manage to visit many places around Sydney with them. My mum loved Madame Tussad as well as other attraction like Sydney Sea life, Sydney tower, Featherdale National Park, Manly Sea Life, Sealife Sydney and many other places.

Chhaithi  (6) Nwaran  (8)

We celebrated Chhori’s Chhathi, Nawaran and Pasni, my mum’s birthday, dad’s birthday, their anniversary, our anniversary , Mother’s day and my nephew’s birthday while they were here.

Aama ko Mukh herne (5) Happy 35th Anniversary Dad & Mum (1) Happy 35th Anniversary Dad & Mum (12)

I have got so used to having them around. It has been the longest time we have been together since I left Nepal to come here. As I was not working after the birth of Chhori, I got to spend heaps of time with them, I feel so lucky to have them around and see them enjoying their grandchildren.

I loved my mum’s cooking, conversation with my dad and spoiling them with small things. It felt so good to buy them things and see them happy.

Wedding Ceremony

But in few a days, all of these are coming to an end for now. I am not sure how I will manage without them.

Not only I but Chhori and my nephew will also miss them badly as they are so used to seeing and playing with their grandma and granddad.

Happy 35th Anniversary Dad & Mum (11)

For me it will be a nightmare as it will be the first time I will be left with Chhori on my own for a long period. As AS will be working it will be Chhori and I alone the whole day. Chhori is growing so fast and has started to roll over which means I can’t even seem to blink my eyes or look away from her and she starts to roll over. I am sure I will cry the first few days.

If things work out as planned, they promise to come back again in 6 months’ time. I am hoping it will happen but in the meantime, it will be all alone with my little on.

I know I am extremely lucky to have them here even for a short period as not everyone is as lucky to have their parents here to help them after child birth but even imagining their not being here makes me so sad.

Wish me luck that I will not go crazy. Any tips on how to look after a baby on my own will be highly appreciated. I hope to share the happy news about their arrival again soon.

Until my next post, take care everyone,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

Guest blog : My hope for my daughters

Thank you Sid for writing this beautiful post for my blog. You can check his blog on Dad Knows . You will realise when you go through his blog why I think him more as a dad than anything else. He is a proud father of two gorgeous gals, Audrey and Anna. 

Thank you to the lovely M for inviting me to write a guest blog post.  Hers is such a beautiful and smart blog, and while I was delighted to have the chance to be a part of it I knew I’d have to create something better than my usual to be worthy of inclusion here.

So what could I write about that would be of interest to nepaliaustralian’s readers?  I haven’t traveled the world like M has, with gorgeous photos and great stories to share.  My knowledge of Nepali culture is limited, and residing in the Great Lakes region of the United States, I’m about as far from Nepal and Australia as one can get without involving NASA or ESA.  Further, I have no experience getting accustomed to living in a foreign land or trying to mesh two cultures or backgrounds together.  I started to think that I really was not a wise choice to help fill up this space, and that maybe M wasn’t as smart as I’d been giving her credit for.

However, when I asked what she’d like me to write about, M replied that (because of my blog) more than anything she thinks of me as a dad, and that it would be fine if I wanted to share something about my daughters.

Ah!  I was then tempted to write that what I want for my daughters as they grow up is no different from what parents in Australia or Nepal – or Colombia, or Ghana, or Estonia, or anywhere else – want for their children.  Can I really say that, though?  Do I really know that for sure?  Definitely not.  I can only assume, and making assumptions about people in different parts of the world can be terribly closed-minded and has all kinds of potential to be wrong.  So then, what?

Well, as bloggers I think we’re all encouraged to write about what we know, and what I know about is my daughters and what my hopes for them are.  So that’s what I’ll write about here.  What I want you readers to do is consider your children – or, if you’re not a parent, the children of the world – and what your hopes for them are.  If I’m right, M has readers from all over the world, and if a few of you respond in the comments below, we might have a fascinating glimpse into all the different hopes and priorities we humans have for our children.  More importantly, I’m hoping we’ll find out that, regardless of where we live, our wishes for our children aren’t really all that different.

First of all, since the moment they were born (and before), I’ve wanted to protect them and keep them safe.  In twelve years, that hasn’t changed one bit.  I may be overprotective at times (it’s what dads do, no?), and fully expect that as the girls become teenagers I’ll get even more protective.  There are scary and dangerous situations and people in the world, and the more independent they get, the more our children need all the wisdom we can pass on to them.  Audrey and Anna will always be my little girls, and I won’t ever stop wanting to keep them safe from harm.  That harm will change form over time – from bullies in elementary school, to strong and overexcited boys in high school, to peers and adults who would take advantage of them at work or in myriad other situations.  Eesh – just writing that makes me want all the more to hold them close.

Safety and protection are not always within our control as parents – some other things, though, are.  It’s been entirely up to my wife and me to provide a loving and happy home for our daughters – and I’m the first to admit that I’ve not always been great at this.  Loving my daughters is easy; giving them a fun, carefree, and happy home isn’t always so easy.  I get tired.  I get frustrated.  I get grumpy.  It’s maybe taken me twelve years, but I think I’m finally getting better at realizing that’s probably what they want more than anything.  Speaking of what’s in our control, no matter how rotten their day at school may be, children should be able to come home and feel safe, secure, happy, and comfortable.  Home should be a refuge for them – the place they can relax, be themselves, say what they want (well, within reason…), act goofy, and feel free to talk about their fears.  I always want them to feel like they can come back home and feel at home.  If they can return home and let their worries and fears just fade away, then my wife and I have done something right.

I also want our girls to grow to be kind, respectful, compassionate, and intelligent ladies.  I can only guess about the rest of the world, but where we live those qualities are scarce.  They’re doing quite well as far as intelligence, and do okay with kindness, but, hoo boy, we’ve a long way to go to get them to be as respectful as we think they can be.  I suppose this wish for my girls is just as much a wish for the rest of the world and anyone they come into contact with!

Another thing we’re having trouble with is instilling in those girls the value of hard work.  Oh, I’m sure they’ll get it someday, but I would really hate for them to become adults and still expect everything to just happen for them, or expect that things will always be easy.  In both cases, they won’t.  The sooner the girls learn that, the better.  (Wish me luck, please!)  I hope that they will never be daunted by the prospect of hard work, and that they’ll be willing to put in as much effort as they need to accomplish their goals.

Something else the world is terribly lacking is respect and compassion for all the other living things that share the planet with us.  I’ll be so, so proud of my daughters if they continue to be as concerned about the welfare of the planet and all its residents as they seem to be so far.  Even at their young ages, the two of them seem to have an inherent concern for all animals – certainly more so than most adults in our society.  My hope is that they never lose that.

Image courtesy universetoday.com

Finally, I’ll mention those things that are almost totally out of our control.  I have no delusions that any of this will happen anytime soon, but I still wish it for my children and for all children all over the planet:  a world with no war, suffering, hunger, disease, or inequality.  I want them to grow up in a world where humanity works together for the good of all, and where religion and culture and nationality and appearance and language and local customs are no more than points of interest that bring us all together.  Will it happen?  I have my doubts.  Can it happen?  Can that kind of world be embraced by everyone?  I think it can happen, and I also know it can start with my Anna and Audrey as much as with anyone else.

For sure I could go on for days about what I want for my children, but this will do.  It’s up to you now.  What do you wish for your children?  What hopes do you have for them, and for all children?

Please click here if you are interested to write a guest post for me.