Category Archives: Health

Period laziness

I have written previously about period in topics like “There is no such thing as a happy period”, “I hate those cycles” and “Period carving”. Today I am here to vent some more of my annoyance regarding the same matter.

You have to forgive me if you think I write about it a lot but you need to understand, it comes every month so there is no way I can avoid it. While I was pregnant and the first 6 months after Chhori was born, I didn’t have it and it was just amazing not to have to think about it. Then suddenly, it decided to be a part of my life again. The very first time after the baby, when it happened, I was so upset. I knew it would come back but I didn’t want it to because along with it, it brought mood swings, unnecessary cravings and laziness.

period_pain

When I am about to have a period, I know it and still can’t control my annoyance at every small thing. I become moody and lazy. I haven’t done my morning exercise for a whole week this week and I keep eating junk food. And all the Easter eggs around is not helping me in anyway at all. All I want to do is sit on the sofa, eat chips and watch TV.

easter eggs

I really feel sorry for AS during this time because anything he does is not good enough and he could do nothing right. I try my best to be good at times but I am not always successful.

I really don’t know how my head works during these times. I will be clam and happy and suddenly, I am angry at small things which, I know at the back of my mind, don’t matter at all. What’s with that? Seriously, I don’t have control over my mood at all.

Now that we have a beautiful baby in our life I don’t want this period monster to take over our life for 4-5 days a month. I have read and heard about things I could eat/drink/do during this time to make me somewhat normal. If you have any special tricks like that which has worked for you please share. I really think I need help otherwise I will waste a few days every month becoming angry and irritated unnecessarily.

Take care everyone,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

Sticking to healthy eating

I just realised that it is harder to stick to a diet once I started working than when I was staying home. When I was working out, I started to eat healthy which meant we didn’t buy any junk food at all. Because sometimes it is so hard to control the cravings so it was best to make no junk food available at home.

On top of that we introduced healthier food into our diet. So along with exercise, it was easier for me to stay in shape.

It has been a month now that I am back at work and it seems like I am eating unhealthy food (cake, chocolates, and chips) more frequently. We have someone’s birth every now and then so the cake is always around. Also with the cake there will be chips and dips and sausage rolls which are hard to resist. I know I need to be in control more but it is so easy to let go when you see everyone else eating.

farewell (2)

It seems rude not to go to morning teas you are invited to as it is a good way to socialise but sometime saying no to cakes makes me stand out from the norm. Last week I went to one morning tea and didn’t eat anything as there was nothing healthy, no fruits at all but I was so happy when I went to one today and saw this healthy platter.

IMG_1589

It had celery, carrot and capsicum with some cheese and biscuits. Perfect for someone who is trying to watch what they eat. I am definitely going to make sure we have this platter along with fruit platters on every morning tea we organise so I can eat without feeling guilty.

How are you eating healthy when there is so much unhealthy food around? So much temptation everywhere you go.

What do you say to decline politely if someone offers you a piece of cake?

Take Care,

from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

P.S: Do not forget to nominate your favourite blog . NEPALIAUSTRALIAN’s Blog Award 2015

Getting healthier and fitter after a baby

Post baby body is a subject talked about a lot. Even before I was pregnant, I used to read about the effect of pregnancy and so forth.

Of course, if you have grown a small human being inside your tummy, your body needs to adjust to that so it is not surprising that the body changes so much. The only thing I wanted while I was pregnant was having a healthy bub and thank God Chhori is perfectly healthy and happy.

Long before I fell pregnant, I told myself, I am going to exercise as normal while pregnant and not make pregnancy an excuse to binge eat.

myoga

I did not do so bad with the pregnancy, as I only ate a few days without thinking and kept exercising unit the day before the birth. I am happy about it but I still managed to put on 18 kilos in total. The recommended average weight gain is 15kg so I was slightly worried that I went above the average even after putting in so much effort but when I looked at Chhori for the first time, it was all worth it.

my pregnancy

When Chhori was 3 months old, I joined a gym and I have shared the ups and downs of it in this blog. After around 6 months, I discovered that my gym did HIIT (high intensity interval training) classes and I joined the session almost every day. Even though I exercised only 30 to 45 minutes a day 4-5 times a week, I saw changes to my body within few weeks. exercising (1)

With exercise and diet, I managed to loose almost all the extra kilos from my body. One of the major changes, I made to my diet was introducing quinoa in place of rice or roti or bread. I know there are people who believe in super foods while others don’t. But for me it worked and I am now in a very healthy weight range again.

Different people have different goals after pregnancy and mine was to be fitter and healthier again and after last week, I have to admit to myself that I have done well. Last weekend I went to a friend’s daughter’s birthday party; it was a fine autumn afternoon in the park and we all had heaps of fun including Chhori who was pushing the walker everywhere.

chhori

Anyway, in that party, I met many people who I hadn’t met for several months and everyone complimented me on how good I looked, how I have lost weight and look as good as before the baby. There are many days when I am not happy with the way I look or my progress but that day I was over the moon, getting all those compliments.

Chhori (3)

I am still eating well and exercising as much as possible. I wake up early a few days and try to do some exercise before going to work. Also during lunch break I either swim, do yoga or run a few times a week. I hope to have leaner muscles and gain more strength. I want to push myself more and keep eating healthy.

Chhori (2)

I want to set an example to Chhori that eating healthy and exercising is really important in life and it is not a choice. If you make excuses there are many you can make but if you want to get what you want, you just need to push yourself harder and result will follow.

Take care everyone,

from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

P.S: Do not forget to nominate your favourite blog . NEPALIAUSTRALIAN’s Blog Award 2015

 

Massage during pregnancy

One of the things I look forward to these days is the massage I get every few weeks.

As you are aware, we used to get massages before as well, particularly aromatherapy massage and it was our treat as a couple but getting a massage while you are pregnant is a completely a different story.

I never knew that pregnancy would make me feel so tired and it being peak summer right now, the weather is not helping either. I know that when you are pregnant, your body temperature is already a bit higher than normal, so the added heat from the outside is bound to make you feel even more uncomfortable. Sometimes I wish I had thought about these things beforehand but I guess it is too late now 🙂 . I still have the rest of the summer before thinking of cooler weather.

I now have swollen feet most of the time (the fact that I am out and about on my feet a lot is not helping) and I am not sure I will see my normal feet anytime soon.

So I highly recommend massage during pregnancy, just make sure you go to the authorise places where they know what they are doing.

All good places will ask you about your medical and health conditions before they start. Our body is changing a considerable amount in order to carry and accommodate our growing baby.  Make sure you mention about even a slight discomfort you have so they make sure you are safe.

I often go to the same place and ask for medium pressure massage on the rest of my body and hard on my feet. If it is too much, I will let them know.

I am pregrant (2)

And the feeling I get after 60 minutes massage is priceless.

Please let me know if there are other things I could do to be more comfortable during my journey.

Take care,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

P.S: Do not forget to vote your favorite blog . NEPALIAUSTRALIAN’s Blog Award 2014

What to eat and avoid during pregnancy?

Since, I found out I am pregnant , I have been reading lots of articles about pregnancy and I really find this one helpful. Sharing it here for anyone who are looking for more information regarding what to eat and avoid during pregnancy.

As soon as women announce “I’m having a baby!”, the congratulations are quickly followed by long lists of dos and don’ts about food. Try ginger for morning sickness. Avoid soft cheese because of listeria. Eat more meat to boost your iron. Eat this fish – but not that one, because of mercury.

Pregnant women are understandably confused. So, how do you strike the balance between nutrition and safety, when so many things are off the menu?

During pregnancy, women need to consume a variety of different foods and need more of the main pregnancy nutrients: protein, folate, calcium, iron, zinc, iodine, and fibre. Here’s a quick guide to the best sources.

Protein: lean meat, chicken, seafood, dairy products, legumes, nuts, eggs

Folate: fortified bread and breakfast cereal, green leafy vegetables, legumes, seeds, chicken, eggs, oranges

Calcium: dairy foods, fortified soy milks, green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, canned fish with bones

Iron: red meat, fortified cereals, egg yolks, green leafy vegetables, legumes, nuts

Zinc: meat, eggs, seafood, nuts, tofu, miso, legumes, wheat germ, wholegrain foods

Iodine: canned salmon and tuna, other fish, oysters, bread fortified with iodine

Fibre: wholemeal and wholegrain breads and high fibre cereals, oats, vegetables and fruit with the skin on.

We have recently shown that a moderate intake of protein (18-20% of a total energy intake) allows pregnant women to eat the best range of foods across all the healthy core groups in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, while optimising vitamin and mineral intakes.

Interestingly, the protein to carbohydrate ratio was related to the amount of muscle and fat tissue in the developing baby. While more research is needed, it may contribute to the risk of developing diabetes in the future.

How much?

The Australian dietary guidelines advise pregnant women to consume the following number of servings from the five core food groups each day.

Vegetables and legumes/beans: five servings. One serve = 75g or 100-350kJ, for example, half a cup cooked green or orange vegetables, one cup of raw salad vegetables, half a medium potato, one tomato.

Fruit: two servings. One serve = 150g or 350kJ, for example, one medium piece (apple, banana, orange), two small pieces (apricots, kiwi fruit), one cup diced or canned fruit.

Grain (cereal) foods, mostly wholegrain or high-fibre varieties: eight-and-a-half servings. One serve = 500kJ, for example, one slice of bread, half a cup of cooked rice, pasta or porridge, one-quarter of a cup muesli, three crispbreads.

Lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds, legumes and beans: three-and-a-half servings. One serve = 500-600kJ, for example, 65g cooked lean meat, 80g cooked lean poultry, 100g cooked fish, two eggs, 170g tofu, 30g nuts, one cup of cooked beans.

Milk, yoghurt, cheese or alternatives, mostly reduced fat: two-and-a-half servings. One serve = 500-600kJ, for example, 250ml milk, 200g yoghurt, two slices (40g) of cheese.

Morning (noon and night) sickness

Nausea and vomiting affects about three in four pregnancies. While the data on fetal risks associated with drug treatment are controversial, non-drug approaches are a good place to start.

Limit exposure to food odours by having foods that do not smell as much during cooking or by reducing cooking time, with stir-frys or a BBQ cooked outdoors.

Nausea can be worse in the presence of hunger, so avoid an empty stomach by having small, frequent meals and snacks comprised of foods that you can tolerate and don’t have much smell, such as fruit or nuts, or raisin bread or sandwiches, or yoghurt. Very cold drinks can help with the nausea and prevent dehydration.

You could try ginger as a ginger tablet, cold ginger beer or ginger cordial. While only some evidence supports the use of ginger and/or vitamin B6 supplements to relieve nausea of pregnancy, they’re unlikely to cause harm.

Mercury and fish

Fish and seafood are important sources of protein and minerals. They are low in saturated fat and are a major source of omega-3 fatty acids.

During pregnancy, omega-3s play an important role in the baby’s developing central nervous system, the brain and retina in eyes. Research shows that maternal omega-3 fatty acid consumption during pregnancy is associated with increased birth weight and improved brain development in the child.

Deficiency of omega-3s is associated with irreversible visual and behaviours deficits in children, as well as an increased risk of depression, pre-eclampsia and pregnancy hypertension in the mother.

Population surveys in the United Kingdom and United States show that pregnant women don’t eat enough fish and therefore omega-3s, partly due to fears about adverse effects of mercury and other toxins (such as polychlorinated biphenyls).

We have shown that pregnant women in Australia also eat less fish than is recommended. But when we estimated what their weekly exposure to mercury would be from eating two to three serves a week, it was well below the targets. Pregnant women in Australia can safely eat fish.

Listeria risk

Due to changes in the immune system during pregnancy, women are more susceptible to food poisoning. But by avoiding all foods that carry a risk for harbouring listeria, women are consuming fewer nutrients.

You don’t have to go without. For every item on the “no” list, there are a number of alternatives:

Avoid pre-packaged cold meats. This includes deli meats and sandwich bars. Instead, choose freshly cooked seafood one to two times per week and/or canned fish up to four times a week. Choose home-cooked meat instead and make it into homemade sandwiches.

Avoid ready-to-eat pre-cooked chicken pieces, especially if cold. Instead, choose home-cooked chicken or hot take-away whole chicken or large pieces – but eat it immediately.

Avoid raw and chilled seafood including oysters, sashimi or sushi, smoked salmon, ready-to-eat peeled prawns, prawn cocktails, sandwich fillings, and prawn salads. Don’t eat shark (flake) or billfish (swordfish, broadbill and marlin). Limit orange roughy (deep sea perch) or catfish to once per week. Instead choose other fish species, including canned salmon and tuna two to three times a week.

Avoid salads (fruit and vegetables) that are pre-prepared or pre-packaged or from salad bars or smorgasbords. Instead, choose freshly prepared homemade salads (with leafy greens or other salad vegetables), fresh fruit, or canned or frozen fruits and vegetables.

Avoid soft, semi-soft and surface-ripened cheeses such as brie, Camembert, ricotta, feta and blue cheese. Instead, choose hard cheeses such as Cheddar or tasty, processed cheese, cheese spreads, or plain cottage cheese if packaged by the manufacturer.

Avoid soft serve ice cream and unpasteurised dairy products such as raw goat’s milk. Instead choose packaged frozen ice cream and pasteurised dairy products such as milk, yoghurt, custard and dairy desserts.

Listeria can live in lower temperatures, so take extra care with foods served cold, and avoid buffets and smorgasbords altogether. Cooking, however, kills listeria but the food needs to be heated until steam rises. And remember to always wash your hands before handling food or starting to prepare foods.

Constipation

Up to 40 per cent of pregnant women develop constipation. This is caused by rising levels of progesterone and oestrogen, and the relaxation of muscles of the bowel. Low fluid and fibre intakes can also play a role.

Mild constipation can be self-treated by increasing high-fibre foods, including soluble (oats, lentils, dried peas and beans, psyllium) and insoluble (wholemeal and wholegrain breads and cereals, wheat bran, vegetables and fruit) fibres. To counter constipation in pregnancy aim for 25 to 28 grams of fibre per day, drink plenty of water (1.5 to two litres per day) and exercise regularly.

Some oral iron supplements can cause constipation. If medication is required, only use what your doctor prescribes as not all laxatives are safe during pregnancy.

Multivitamins

Women planning or in early pregnancy are likely to need a folic acid supplement to reduce the risk of the baby having a neural-tube defect, and iodine for the developing brain and nervous system.

Multivitamin supplements may be recommended when there is a fairly high chance of not meeting nutrient needs from food. This is more likely for pregnant adolescents, vegetarians, those on pre-existing special diets, individuals with drug, tobacco and alcohol addictions, or obese pregnant women on medically restricted diets to limit weight gain.

Pregnancy is an important time to focus on what you eat. The food-based recommendations in the Australian Dietary Guidelines will help you enjoy a variety of foods while getting the best mix of nutrients important at this time.

Clare Collins is a Professor in Nutrition and Dietetics at University of Newcastle. She receives or has received funding from NHMRC, ARC, Hunter Medical researcg Institute, The University of Newcastle, Meat and Livestock Australia.

Michelle Blumfield is a Postdoctoral researcher, Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition at University of Newcastle. She does not work for, consult to, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has no relevant affiliations.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Take care,

M from nepaliaustralian

XOXO

P.S: Do not forget to vote your favorite blog . NEPALIAUSTRALIAN’s Blog Award 2014